1 Now it happened that while the crowd was pressing around Him and listening to the word of God, He was standing by the lake of Gennesaret;
2 and He saw two boats lying at the edge of the lake; but the fishermen had gotten out of them and were washing their nets.
3 And He got into one of the boats, which was Simon’s, and asked him to put out a little way from the land. And He sat down and began teaching the
people from the boat.
4 When He had finished speaking, He said to Simon, “Put out into the deep water and let down your nets for a catch.”
5 Simon answered and said, “Master, we worked hard all night and caught nothing, but I will do as You say and let down the nets.”
6 When they had done this, they enclosed a great quantity of fish, and their nets began to break;
7 so they signaled to their partners in the other boat for them to come and help them. And they came and filled both of the boats, so that they began to sink.
8 But when Simon Peter saw that, he fell down at Jesus’ feet, saying, “Go away from me Lord, for I am a sinful man!”
9 For amazement had seized him and all his companions because of the catch of fish which they had taken;
10 and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, “Do not fear, from now on you will be
catching men.”
11 When they had brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed Him.


Jesus is the only Savior who meets us where we are. 

That Jesus went into Peter, James, and John’s boat (v. 3)—not waiting for them to come to Him—illustrates His intentional grace. In like manner, Jesus interrupts our daily routines and wreaks holy havoc into our schedules in the name of grace. 

Jesus enters into the rhythm of our lives and disrupts everything. He requested that the boat be “put out a little way from the land” (v. 3), away from the safety of the shore. Peter, James, and John were thus invited into an unfamiliar experience. 

Christ’s call to cast their nets was a metaphor for their new calling. They left everything to follow Jesus—no longer would they be fishermen, but they would be fishers of men. 

God is not bound by conventional ways: He uses the ordinary routines of our lives to teach us the importance of gospel conversations.

The uniqueness of the gospel call—to go and make fishers of men—inspires both awe and repentance. The irresistible Jesus’ miracle with the fishled Peter to confess his inadequacy for the call: “But when Simon Peter saw
that, he fell down at Jesus’ feet, saying,

‘Go away from me Lord, for I am a sinful man!’

For amazement had seized him and all his companions because of the catch of fish which they had taken” (vv. 8-9). Peter admitted his sin; he admitted the miracle of Jesus’ choosing him to join God’s call. Peter, James, and John “left everything and followed Him” (v. 11).

God’s call invites us into waters deeper than we ever imagined—we mustn’t get used to the shallow end.

  • How does the uniqueness of this miracle speak to the way God uses ordinary people for His extraordinary plans?
  • Peter, James, and John abandoned “everything” to follow Jesus. What’s left of your “everything”? What are you still holding on to that prevents your full-out commitment to Jesus?


Humbly thank the Lord for calling an ordinary sinner such as yourself to join Him in His extraordinary mission.